Last edited by Maukinos
Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

3 edition of A plain and easie rule to rigge any ship by the length of his masts and yards found in the catalog.

A plain and easie rule to rigge any ship by the length of his masts and yards

A plain and easie rule to rigge any ship by the length of his masts and yards

without any further trouble.

  • 172 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Printed by W. Godbid for William Fisher ... in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Masts and rigging.,
  • Naval architecture.

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesEarly English books, 1641-1700 -- 1521:7.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination8 p.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16718633M

    The historian's guide, or, Britain's remembrancer being a summary of all the actions, exploits, sieges, battels, designs, attempts, preferments, honours, changes &c. and whatever else is worthy notice that hath happen'd in His Majesty's kingdoms from Anno. Dom. to this time: shewing the year, month and day of the month in which each action was done: with an alphabeticall table for the. The seaman's vade-mecum, and defensive war by sea: containing, the proportions of rigging, masts and yards, Also shewing how to prepare a book-keeping; By William Mountaine, [William Mountaine] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The 18th century was a wealth of knowledge, exploration and rapidly growing technology and expanding record-keeping made possible .

      3 reasons I can think of. 1. To carry more sail on a single mast, you inevitably have to go upwards moving away from the center of gravity. The further away from the COG, the greater the heeling forces and therefore the more weight that will hav. A A plain and easy rule to rigge any ship by the length of his masts, and yards, w A To the Most Excellent Majesty of James the IId by the grace of God of England, S A The Imperial acheiuement of our dread sovereign King Charles together with ye ar B Proclamation anent the rendezvouses of the.

    The spret-sail yard 16 yards long, and but 9 inches thick, and your Misen-yard so long as the Mast, the Top-yards bears half proportion to the main, and Fore-yard, and the Top-gallants, the half to Page 17 them, but this rule is not absolute, for if your Masts be taunt, your Yards must be the shorter; if a low Mast, the lon∣ger: but this is. A cutter is generally a small to medium-sized vessel, depending on its role and definition. Historically, it was a smallish single-masted, decked sailcraft designed for speed rather than such, it was gaff-rigged, with two or more headsails and often a bowsprit of some length, with a mast sometimes set farther back than on a sloop. While historically a workboat, as used by harbor.


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A plain and easie rule to rigge any ship by the length of his masts and yards Download PDF EPUB FB2

A plain and easie rule to rigge any ship by the length of his masts, and yards, without any further trouble. A plain and easie rule to rigge any ship by the length of his masts and yards: without any further trouble.

A Plain and Easie RULE TO RIGGE ANY SHIP BY The Length of his MASTS and YARDS. Without any further Trouble. LONDON, Printed for William Fisher at the Postern-Gate neer Tower-Hill.

A plain and easie rule to rigge any ship by the length of his masts, and yards, without any further troubleAuthor: Henry.

Bond. A plain and easie rule to rigge any ship by the length of his masts, and yards, without any further trouble: Bond, Henry. / [] The boate swaines art, or, The compleat boat swaine by Henry Bond.

Bond, John, / []. *Thus, Henry Bond in published a very detailed book entitled A Plain and Easie Rule to Rigge any Ship by the length of his Masts, and Yards.

Without any Further Trouble. Also here is added a Plain and Easie Rule for Rigging andy Ship by the Length of its own Masts and Yards. London, Printed by W. Godbid, for William Fisher at the Postern-Gate near Tower-Hill, and Benjamin Hurlock over against St. Magnus-Church on London-Bridge near Thmes-Street.

Seamanship: Including Names of Principal Parts of a Ship ; Masts, Sails, Yards, &c. ; Knots and Splices ; Fittings of Standing Rigging ; Rigging of Masts ; Yards and Bowspirit ; Fittings of Tackles ; Setting Up Rigging ; Tanks, Ballast, and Provisions ; Rule of Road & Vessel's Lights ; Sea Terms ; Managing Sails ; Boat Sailing ; Stowage of Anchors and Cables ; to Unmoor and Proceed to Sea.

The shrouds support the masts, and transfer the energy of the wind from the sails to the hull. The wind fills the sails, the sails pull the yards, the yards pull the masts (by way of the parrels, which Heller never understood), and the masts, by means of the shrouds and other standing rigging, pull the ship.

A plain and easie rule to rigge any ship by the length of his masts, and yards, without any further trouble (London: Printed for William Fisher), by Henry Bond (HTML at EEBO TCP) By the Honourable John Nanfan, Esq; lieutenant governour and commander in. A A plain and easy rule to rigge any ship by the length of his masts, and yards, w A To the Most Excellent Majesty of James the IId by the grace of God of England, S A The Imperial acheiuement of our dread sovereign King Charles together with ye ar B Proclamation anent the rendezvouses of the militia, for the year   A plain and easy rule to rigge any ship by the length of his masts, and yards, without any further trouble 23% “the”.

51% “the” if you count differently AN EXACT LIST OF THE FRENCH Fleet and Commanders For this Present YEAR 51% of “words” –. All such information is subject to copyright notices published in these publications.

The Fully Framed Model (Volume 1): HMN Swan Class Sloops The Fully Framed Model (Volume 2): HMN Swan Class Sloops The Fully Framed Model (Volume 4): Rigging A Sixth Rate Sloop.

The book business changed a lot. Libraries changed a lot. A plain and easy rule to rigge any ship by the length of his masts, and yards, without any further trouble.

23% “the”. 51% “the” if you count differently. AN EXACT LIST OF THE FRENCH Fleet and. A A plain and easy rule to rigge any ship by the length of his masts, and yards, w A To the Most Excellent Majesty of James the IId by the grace of God of England, S A The Imperial acheiuement of our dread sovereign King Charles together with ye ar B Proclamation anent the rendezvouses of the militia, for the year   Introduction to Ship Stability and Construction Tutorial Sheet - Buoyancy and Floatation of Box shaped Vessels Question 1: A ship has an underwater volume of.

Seamanship; including names of principal parts of a ship masts, sails, yards, & c. [George Strong Nares] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher.

Not indexed. Not illustrated. Excerpt: using the rudder with the Author: George Strong Nares. A skipper on a boat notices wave crests passing his anchor chain every 5 sec. He estimates the distance between wave crests to be 15m. He also correctly estimates the speed of the waves. What is this speed.

(a) 5 m/sec (b) 15 m/sec (c) 10 m/sec (d) 3 m/sec. It could be a simple as removing the broken section of the topgallant or topmast and replacing it, or in bad cases removing the entire mast including the mainmast.

There where two basic methods of attaching the sail to the ship itself. There where deck, or keel stepped masts. The Seaman's Vade-mecum and Defensive War by Sea; Containing the Proportions of Rigging, Masts and Yards Also Shewing how to Prepare a Merchant-ship for a Close Fight [William Mountaine] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without.

Seamanship: Including Names of Principal Parts of a Ship; Masts, Sails, Yards, Etc.; Bends and Hitches; Manufacture and Tests of Steel Wire Rope; Flexible Steel Wire Hawsers, and Chain Cable [Nares, George S.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Seamanship: Including Names of Principal Parts of a Ship; Masts, Sails, Yards, Etc.; Bends and Hitches; Manufacture and 1/5(1).Buy Seamanship: Including names of principal parts of a ship, masts, sails, yards, & c 5th ed.

rev. and corr by Nares, George S (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Author: George S Nares. Lines were getting replaced regularly anyway due to use (especially running rigging that move around a lot) and any sailor worth the name knew how to deal with and replace them.

The biggest concern are yards (things sails are on) and spars (parts of masts).