Last edited by Nejas
Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

3 edition of Notes on Hopi clans and Hopi kinship. found in the catalog.

Notes on Hopi clans and Hopi kinship.

Lowie, Robert Harry

Notes on Hopi clans and Hopi kinship.

by Lowie, Robert Harry

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  • 13 Currently reading

Published by AMS Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Hopi Indians -- Social life and customs.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesNotes on Hopi clans.
    SeriesAnthropological papers of the American Museum of Natural History ;, v. 30, pts. 6-7.
    ContributionsLowie, Robert Harry, 1883-1957.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE99.H7 L914 1976
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. 307-397 :
    Number of Pages397
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5047395M
    ISBN 100404118739
    LC Control Number74007984

    The Hopi have many clans, such as the Bear and Parrot clans, within each village. Clans that emerged into the fourth way of life or migrated together are considered phratries. Each of the 34 living clans is distinct but related to other clans within their particular phratries. Special duties are associated with membership in each clan.   One book that goes into depth and detail was beautifully written by Frank Waters, who spent quite some time with the Hopi in the mid s. He faithfully wrote down the words of thirty elders of the Hopi clans. The Book Of The Hopi gives startling insight into these ancient and beautiful customs. The way of life for the Hopi is their religion.

    Hopi Proper Names — Voth. 73 The notes by Mindeleff, Hodge, Fewkes, and others on this ques- tion are very valuable as advance information, but a better acquaint- ance with the language, traditions, and myths of the H6pi than we have heretofore possessed will be necessary before we can speak with any degree of authority as to the origin. 1 Robert H. Lowie, Hopi Kinship, AMNH-AP 30, pt. 7, 2 Of Isleta, Sandia, Picuris, and Taos. 3 As among the matrilineal Crow and Hidatsa (R. H. Lowie, Notes on the Social Organiza-.

    Sun Chief: Autobiography of a Hopi Indian is a book written by Don C. Talayesva, a Hopi who learned the ways of white people. Talayesva and Simmons write to educate the reader about the Hopi culture. The book is told from only one man's point-of-view and yet Talayesva writes in a way that introduces all readers to the unique ways of life shared. Materials for the compilation of this book were acquired from Hopi spokesmen (30 elders of the Hopi Indian tribe in northern Arizona) who regarded it as a monumental record that would give their descendants a complete history of their people and their religious beliefs. It was also desired that the 4-part book serve the practical purpose of helping to solve current Hopi problems of local self.


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Notes on Hopi clans and Hopi kinship by Lowie, Robert Harry Download PDF EPUB FB2

ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: Spine title. Reprint of the ed. of Notes on Hopi clans and of the ed. of Hopi kinship which were published as pts.

6 and 7 of v. 30 of Anthropological papers of the American Museum of Natural History. Hopi - Kinship Kin Groups and Descent. Hopi society is divided into exogamous matrilineal ranked clans, the number varying over time.

Clans are associated into exogamous phratries. Clans own farmland close to the villages and claim eagle-nesting grounds away from the village where eagles are captured for ceremonial use. NOTES. CHAPTER TAIL-PIECES.

These little drawings represent the clan symbols of the various groups Notes on Hopi clans and Hopi kinship. book clans mentioned in this book There are also several petroglyphic drawings introduced.

The symbols found at the end of each chapter can be identified as follows: THE TRUTH OF A HOPI: Chapter I The Migration (petroglyph). Chapter II. Masauwu Clan. Notes on Hopi Clans.

American Museum of Natural History, Anthropological Papers Lummis, Ch. The Land of Poco Tiempo. New York. Some Strange Corners of our Country. New York. Pueblo Indian Folk-stories. New York. Luxan, Diego Perez de Expedition into New Mexico made by Antonio do Espejo, 7 Hopi Journal.

* K. Lowie, Notes on Hopi Clans. AMNH-AI’,lo Dr. Steward was also given an account of the initiation ritual proper which was de- scribed as like that of Powamu with a kachina sand painting and whipping by the Tunwub by: 7. Book of the Hopi by Frank Waters, Viking Press () Book Summary and Analysis by David Worrell.

Published five years before Castaneda's first book, so the possibility that a young anthropology student interested in the southwest might easily have encountered this work is not at all far-fetched.

There will be few comments on my part--mostly quotes—appearing in italics. Hopi clan traditions often cover hundreds of years, but small kinship units rarely survive the whims of fertility and mortality for more than a few generations (e.g., Gaines and Gaines THE KINSHIP NOMENCLATURE OF THE PUEBLO INDIANS By ELSIE CLEWS PARSONS T 0 THE standing controversy about the influence of sociological factors as against the influence of linguistic factors in kinship nomenclature, Dr.

Lowie has recently made a contribution based on an analysis of Hopi nomenclature.’. Rather than kinship units organized by a dogma of unilineal descent, Hopi clans are shown to operate as local groups-Lévi- Straussian "houses "-organized by the control of ceremonies and the.

Waters wrote in the opening notes of “Book of the Hopi”: “the Hopi spokesmen willingly and freely gave the information they were qualified to impart by reason of their clan affiliations. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Lowie, Robert Harry, Notes on Hopi clans.

New York, American Museum of Natural History, A list of clans the class has studied to this date. A B; Tobacco: Pipwungwa: Rabbit: Tapwungwa: Roadrunner: Posiwungwa: Sun: Taawawungwa: Rattlesnake.

Deliberate Acts: Peter M. Whiteley’s Hopi Hermeneutics and the “Collaborative Road”. Thomas E. Sheridan. With the publication of Deliberate Acts ina young British anthropologist named Peter M. Whiteley took on some of the giants of North American ethnology. As he notes in the preface of the book, Whiteley (b) had the temerity to develop ideas that “remain largely Hopi in.

Here the noted folklorist brings together traditional accounts of epic events and adventures in the life of Hopi clans and villages, from legendary to historical times. The setting of these various adventures and events is not the Southwest as we know it today, but a vast and largely unpeopled wilderness in which clans and families wandered in Reviews: Another version recounts how the Hopi clans wandered across the land, from one end to another.

The clans multiplied and split into more clans - there were times of peace, when clans lived together in harmony, then there were times of discord and argument, when clans split and went separate ways. found in "The Problem of Hopi Adjustment" (American Anthropolo-gist, Vol.

45, I). In Press. 2 "Own" is used as a prefix to kinship titles among the Hopi only for the benefit of bahanas (whites) who are always concerned with the dis-tinction between real and classificatory kinship.

Hopi-eye view of their society, that a husband would be. The Book of the Hopi, (Penguin Books, ). ^ H.R. Voth. The Traditions of the Hopi, 1 (Chicago, ) ^ Harold Courlander explains that this version of the story is an attempt to amalgamate two conflicting Hopi traditions dealing with two female deities.

Hopi clan migration traditions appear to hold valuable knowledge about precontact Puebloan life. Some scholars, however, question the historical veracity of these migration stories, noting that small, unilineal, exogamous groups cannot move independently, nor are they likely to have persisted for the hundreds of years necessary to maintain the knowledge attributed to them.

White Feather’s account is corroborated by a passage from the classic Book of the Hopi, written by Frank Waters and Oswald White Bear Fredericks, published in World War III will be started by those peoples who first received the light [the divine wisdom or intelligence] in the other old countries [India, China, Egypt, Palestine, Africa].

Book reviewed in this article: NORTH AMERICA: Notes on Hopi Clans. Robert H. Lowie. Hopi Kinship. Robert H. Lowie. Note: White Bear (Oswald Fredericks) was one of those rare Humans I met that I can call without hesitation a master.

When talking with him at times, I could see a bright white light emanating from his aura, even in broad daylight. He was the last Human representative to sit in .Pueblo groups (hopi) nucleated, permenant settlements horti live on mesa tops permenant multistory agriculture made of adobe kivas and plazas: special worship, dances and public affairs masks, katcinas, medicine man elaborate relgion: emergence from underworld Navahos: yrs ago, dangerous--H and G horti steal from Hopi.In the beginning Taiowa created his Nephew to lay out the the universes in proper order.

And so begins Frank Waters' book of the Hopi. Fully a third of the book is dedicated to telling the lore of this tribe, and through the saga you learn of a tradition that explains why this small group of people have been living in the same area for a millenia/5(53).