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Friday, May 22, 2020 | History

3 edition of Trends in oral cancer mortality in the United States, Sweden, France, and Hong Kong, 1950-1980 found in the catalog.

Trends in oral cancer mortality in the United States, Sweden, France, and Hong Kong, 1950-1980

Trends in oral cancer mortality in the United States, Sweden, France, and Hong Kong, 1950-1980

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Published by Dept. of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Chapel Hill, N.C .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States,
  • Sweden,
  • France,
  • China,
  • Hong Kong
    • Subjects:
    • Mouth -- Cancer -- United States -- Statistics,
    • Mouth -- Cancer -- Sweden -- Statistics,
    • Mouth -- Cancer -- France -- Statistics,
    • Mouth -- Cancer -- China -- Hong Kong -- Statistics

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby Joseph M. Janis ... [et al.].
      SeriesInstitute of Statistics mimeo series ;, no. 1481
      ContributionsJanis, Joseph M.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsRA645.C3 T75 1985
      The Physical Object
      Pagination50 p. :
      Number of Pages50
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2666889M
      LC Control Number85621670

      The use of tobacco, including smokeless tobacco and excessive consumption of alcohol are the prominent risk factors in oral cancer (re: Global Facts on Tobacco or Oral Health). The 58th World Health Assembly Resolution on Cancer Prevention and Control (WHA, 25 May ) urged Member States to develop and reinforce cancer control programmes. Oral cancer risk can be lowered or even prevented by simply understanding basic oral hygiene, different bacteria found in the mouth, and how diet influences oral cancers. Currently, research is being done on the relationship between diet and oral cancer. Oral cancer is a Cited by:

      Five year survival by type. Note: This is not a complete list of cancer mortality rates as published by the figures are at least five years old and do not reflect recent advances in medicine that have improved the detection and treatments of cancer and their outcomes. after the age of 80 in the United States, Sweden, France, England, and Japan. N Engl J Med (18): –5. 7Schneider EL, Brody JA. Aging, natural death, and the compression of morbidity: Another view. N Engl J Med (14)–6. Men Women Japan Japan Iceland Hong Kong, China Sweden France File Size: KB.

        Overview of trends. Between and , age-standardised mortality rates declined for breast, lung, colon, and prostate cancers in the United Kingdom ().For all four cancer types across all Cited by:   Mortality from oral cancer has been rising appreciably in most European countries up to the late s, essentially for men. To update trends in oral cancer, death certification data from oral and pharyngeal cancer for 27 European countries were abstracted and analysed from the WHO mortality database over the period Cited by:


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Trends in oral cancer mortality in the United States, Sweden, France, and Hong Kong, 1950-1980 Download PDF EPUB FB2

Trends in oral cancer mortality in the United States, Sweden, France and Hong Kong, Author: J. Janis, Lisa A. Kammerman, Kathleen Edwards, Lawrence L. Kupper. Author(s): Janis,Joseph M Title(s): Trends in oral cancer mortality in the United States, Sweden, France, and Hong Kong, / by Joseph M.

Janis. Top 4 Cancer Sites. Reduce the colorectal cancer death rate to deaths perpeople per year. Reduce the lung cancer death rate to deaths perpeople per year.

Reduce the female breast cancer death rate to deaths perfemales per year. Mortality from oral cancer has been rising appreciably in most European countries up to the late s, essentially for men. To update trends in oral cancer, death certification data from oral and pharyngeal cancer for 27 European countries were abstracted and analysed from the WHO mortality database over the period –Cited by: Oral cancer mortality rates were much lower in middle age women, but showed appreciably upward trends in several countries, at least until the mid s.

The highest rates in middle age women were in Hungary (/,), Belgium (), Denmark and Slovakia (; Fig. Table by: Because, for most of the 25 member states of the EU, cancer mortality rates are available since at least and until at leastwe have provided annual age‐standardized rates for 8 major cancer sites among both genders and in each separate country for the most recent calendar year available as well as trends in cancer mortality in the Cited by:   The incidence of cancer in the United Kingdom has increased significantly over the last four decades.

The aim of this study was to examine trends in UK cancer incidence and mortality by cancer Cited by: 3. In Western Europe, cancer mortality rates peaked in the late s, and the fall in cancer mortality in the European Union (EU) between and has been approximately 10%.

1, 2 Over more recent years, 1 mortality from lung and other tobacco–related neoplasms, but also a few other common sites, has started to level off and decline among males in Central and Eastern Europe, too. 3Cited by: Oral Cancer. Death Rate PerAge Standardized SELECT CAUSE.

COVID MALE BOTH FEMALE. ICD CODES: CC Data rounded. Decimals affect ranking. Data Source: WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION.

Age Adjusted Death Rate Estimates: Calculations Provided by World Life Expectancy Data Accuracy Not Guaranteed WHO Excludes Cause of Death Data. Lifetime Risk of Developing Cancer: Approximately percent of men and women will be diagnosed with oral cavity and pharynx cancer at some point during their lifetime, based on – data.

Prevalence of This Cancer: Inthere were an estimatedpeople living with oral cavity and pharynx cancer in the United States. Database searches. PubMed and Google scholar were searched for articles from till Juneonly in English with MeSH terms ‘incidence rate’, ‘epidemiology’, ‘trend of incidence’, ‘demographics’, ‘oral cancer’, ‘oral squamous cell carcinoma’, ‘oropharyngeal cancer’, ‘head and neck cancer’, ‘young patients’ and ‘patients under 40 years’.Cited by:   A recent analysis of lung cancer mortality trends in the 15 member states of the European Union (EU) has shown declining trends for men in 11 member states (the earliest occurring in Finland and in the United Kingdom in the early s), stable trends in France and Greece, but rising trends in Portugal and by: Trends in oral cavity cancer incidence, mortality, survival and treatment in the Netherlands Boukje A.C.

van Dijk1,2, Marieke T. Brands3, Sandra M.E. Geurts4, Matthias A.W. Merkx3 and Jan L.N. Roodenburg5 1 Department of Research, Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organisation (IKNL), Utrecht, The Netherlands 2 Department of Epidemiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Cited by: This year, an estima adults (38, men women) in the United States will be diagnosed with oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

Rates of these cancers are more than twice as high in men as in women. Oral and oropharyngeal cancer are the eighth most common cancer among men.

The average age of diagnosis is Background Incidence-based mortality modelling comparing the risk of breast cancer death in screened and unscreened women in nine Swedish counties has suggested a 39% risk reduction in women 40 to 69 years old after introduction of mammography screening in the s and s.

Objective We evaluated changes in breast cancer mortality in the same nine Swedish counties using a model Cited by: National Cancer Institute. Lung cancer incidence trends among men and women – United States, – Henley SJ, Richareds TB, Underwood JM, et al.

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ;63(01):1–5. Invasive Cancer Incidence and Survival—United States, Henley SJ, Singh SD, King JK et al. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. (3) The incidence of oral cavity cancer (OCC) is increasing and has replaced laryngeal cancer as the most frequently occurring cancer in the head and neck area in the Netherlands.

1, 2 Between andthe absolute number of OCCs has doubled, whereas the overall occurrence of cancer of the head and neck has risen less fast. Inroughly one in three head and neck cancer cases was OCC Cited by:   Worldwide, lung cancer is the most common malignancy and the most common cause of cancer deaths in the past few decadesa total of Cited by: The most recent Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data confirms that six of the eight states identified in this report with increasing trends in oral cancer mortality were also among the states with higher than average rates of current smokers, which include Ohio, Nevada, North Carolina, Wyoming, Iowa and Maine.

Moreover, these states were also among the states with higher than Cited by: The National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program has been an important source of information on cancer in the United States since the mids.

Click on the links below for details about oral cancer rates from the most recent survey (). For this purpose, rates and trends in rates over 20–50 years have been compared in five European countries of similar economic status (France, Italy, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the UK).Cited by: United States and Eastern Europe, whereas the highest rates among females are in North America and Northern Europe.

Because of low survival even in more developed countries, lung cancer mortality rates are generally similar to incidence rates (Supplementary Fig.

S3). Lung cancer trends in a given country are primarily shaped byCited by:   Trends of oral cavity, oropharyngeal and laryngeal cancer incidence in Scotland (–) – A socioeconomic perspective. Oral Oncol ; 70– PubMedCited by: 5.